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How Europe’s bank spends cash for climate undermines Paris commitments

The EU’s 28 finance ministers will be meeting tomorrow (May 23) to discuss the priorities of the European Investment Bank (EIB) for the coming year. A new analysis finds the bank’s contribution to Europe’s response to the climate crisis has been worryingly insufficient and needs to be stepped up.

The winners and losers of climate action at the European Investment Bank

This analysis of the bank’s climate action is based on the climate action database disclosed by the EIB. The database includes projects which were signed in 2016 and classified in line with the methodology approved by the bank in its Climate Strategy.

Question marks abound over EU-Azerbaijan gas tango

Ministers, ambassadors and envoys from at least 15 countries, including Maroš Šefčovič, the European Commission’s Vice President for the Energy Union, are gathered today in the Azerbaijani capital to discuss the progress on the Southern Gas Corridor, the largest energy project the EU is currently pursuing.

But over the past couple of months, it seems the European Commission’s justifications for this controversial undertaking have been crumbling by the day.

Little left of human rights


Reviewing the European Investment Bank's carbon footprint methodology

The briefing makes recommendations for the European Investment Bank's methodology for calculating greenhouse gas emissions, which is currently under review. It also provides case studies that illustrate the shortcomings of the bank's current approach - most notably its strategy towards supporting gas projects.

Backdoor for coal subsidies remains half open under new EU rules

While it may seem like a gesture to coal-dependent countries such as Poland, the Winter Package of EU energy market rules, presented yesterday (30 November), will make using coal subsidies more difficult.


The great coal jobs fraud - unrealistic employment claims in southeast Europe

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This report reveals how and why promises for new jobs in south-east Europe’s coal sector are exaggerated. Hardly any coal operations across the region are economically viable, and as a result many coal workers, especially in the mines, are set to lose their jobs, even if the plans for countless new power plants materialise. Governments, coal workers and their wider communities need to work together towards a just transition.

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Infographic: The great coal jobs fraud

Promises for new jobs in south-east Europe’s coal sector are exaggerated. Hardly any coal operations across the region are economically viable, and as a result many coal workers, especially in the mines, are set to lose their jobs, even if the plans for countless new power plants materialise. This infographic shows labour productivity in mines across the region and compares them with those of other countries.

Bosnia and Herzegovina
41° 7' 1.6428" N, 16° 52' 19.1136" E
Macedonia
41° 36' 31.086" N, 21° 44' 42.99" E
Montenegro
42° 42' 31.2408" N, 19° 22' 27.804" E
Serbia
30° 2' 4.6752" S, 51° 13' 3.7164" W
Romania
45° 56' 35.3796" N, 24° 58' 0.336" E
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Chinese investors
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Export credit agencies
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World Bank Group
Topic: 
Energy & climate

[Campaign update] Montenegro's Pljevlja coal plant is running out of time to secure financing

The Czech daily Hospodarske Noviny (English: "Economic Newspaper") is reporting today that the Czech Export Bank (CEB) and export insurance agency EGAP may not be be able to finance the Pljevlja II lignite power plant in Montenegro due to new OECD rules entering force on 1 January 2017.


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