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Under heavy skies: dire results from first independent pollution monitoring in Montenegro

It was ten in the evening on 17 December when my colleague and I arrived in Pljevlja, Montenegro. Although we could feel the smell of burnt coal already while driving there, the minute we set foot out of the car, the air was stifling. “This place reminds me of childhood, it smells like in your grandparents’ house when the chimney was stuffed and all the smoke came inside. Only this is outside", he said, with a scarf pulled over his nose.


[Campaign Update] New blow to Bosnia-Herzegovina coal plans as Energy Community requires changes to permit

A new coal-fired power plant in Bosnia-Herzegovina will have adhere to stricter air quality standards, according to a new ruling by the Energy Community Secretariat.

The decision comes in response to a complaint filed by the environmental NGO Ekotim regarding the environmental permit enabling the construction of the 350 MW Banovići power plant in north-eastern Bosnia-Herzegovina.

The complaint, filed in July 2016, claimed that the Federal Ministry of Environment and Tourism had failed to require pollution limits as obliged under the Energy Community Treaty.

Topic: 
Energy & climate

[Campaign update] Pljevlja residents protest against air pollution

Once again people from Pljevlja in northern Montenegro have taken to the streets to protest against the awful pollution that has been plaguing the town for years.


Call the chimney sweepers! Independent monitoring shows for first time true level of air pollution near coal plant in Serbia

Smoke signals the coming of a polluted winter in Drmno, Serbia. Bankwatch’s independent air quality measurements show for the first time the alarming levels of dust particles near the Kostolac B power plant.


[Campaign update] World Bank non-compliant with its own resettlement policies in Kosovo

The World Bank has this week published the Investigation Report of its Inspection Panel for the involuntary resettlement of residents in the village of Hade near Pristina in Kosovo. The investigation, undertaken following a complaint by current and former Hade residents and KOSID, confirms that considerable and un-repairable damage was caused to Hade residents during displacement, in order to open the way for the mines of the proposed "Kosova e Re" power plant.


The sound and the fury: new film documents the plight of communities near Romanian coal plant

Oppressive noise and a cloud of dust engulf the residents of Roșia de Jiu and Rogojel, villages located next to Romania’s Rovinari power plant. In a new video, Bankwatch Romania has documented the toll that producing coal energy is having on these communities that live near the lignite mines, transport belts and power plant at Rovinari.


Why coal is not the way forward - facts versus myths

Coal is the single biggest contributor to global climate change. But governments and investors planning new coal capacities have a range of flimsy arguments why coal would be the best or the only alternative. This briefing busts a number of myths surrounding coal, such as "coal is cheap", "alleviates poverty" or "coal is clean".


Overblown job promises in southeast Europe's coal sector show the need for a just transition - report

Promises for new jobs in south-east Europe’s coal sector are exaggerated, a new Bankwatch report reveals. Hardly any coal operations across the region are economically viable, and as a result many coal workers, especially in the mines, are set to lose their jobs, even if the plans for countless new power plants materialise. Governments, coal workers and their wider communities need to work together towards a just transition.

The great coal jobs fraud - unrealistic employment claims in southeast Europe

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This report reveals how and why promises for new jobs in south-east Europe’s coal sector are exaggerated. Hardly any coal operations across the region are economically viable, and as a result many coal workers, especially in the mines, are set to lose their jobs, even if the plans for countless new power plants materialise. Governments, coal workers and their wider communities need to work together towards a just transition.

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